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Author:

 

J. Romero Magalhães


Report:

 

15


Page:

 

35


Year:

 

1988


Subject Matter:

 

British Community and Family History



Excerpt:

 

"In the little kingdom of the Algarve there are vast quantities of wine, oil, corn, almonds, figs and other fruits". This was the information any Englishman interested in the Algarve could easily obtain in 1762. All he had to do was open Adam Anderson's book "An Historical and Chronological Deduction of the Origin of Commerce".

A more inquisitive Englishman might ask what went from England to the Algarve. And the answer would be cereals, dried peas, cheese and butter, potatoes, yards and yards of wool fabric, stuffing, socks and hats, ammunition, ink, pitch, boxes of tobacco, wooden combs, glass, clocks, ploughs and other iron tools for various uses. He might learn that sometimes cod was freighted and that his contrymen transported products from America and the Baltic. But, no doubt, only very few would tell him that the English were pointed out as the cause of the economic misfortunes which occured in the extreme south of the Portuguese territory.

 

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